Does Almond Milk Break A Fast?

Almond milk is a healthy vegan choice milk substitute that offers an important source of protein but unfortunately it will cause you to break a fast. Let’s check out more of what we know about almond milk and why this is the case.

Are There Calories In Almond Milk?

Yes, there are calories in almond milk – about 39 per cup. That’s not a ton, but it’s enough to cause your body to go into “feeding mode” which will break your fast.

Plus, this is assuming that the almond milk you consume is unflavored. Chocolate, vanilla, and other flavors have even more sugar which will also have a worse impact on your fast.

For this reason, by all means, go for the natural unsweetened version of almond milk if you’re going to drink it while on fasting days.

Of course, while 39 calories is not a massive number, some people might consume more than this per serving. If you have a particularly large cup of almond milk or multiple servings throughout the day, this can quickly add up and defeat the purpose of your fast altogether.

Almond breeze nutritional information

Likewise, the unsweetened version of the milk yields just 1g carbohydrate, while in the sweetened ones this number jumps all the way up to 21g (depending on brand and flavor) at 100 calories.

See Also: Does Sugar Free Creamer Break a Fast?

Will Almond Milk Raise Insulin Levels?

Yes, almond milk will raise insulin levels as it contains both carbohydrates and proteins. Under fasted conditions, the introduction of either of these macronutrients inevitably leads to blood sugar raising.

In response, insulin is released from the pancreas in order to keep blood sugar levels balanced. At this point, autophagy is shut down, along with the body’s fat utilization. Calories are shuttled into either muscle or fat cells, replenishing liver glycogen stores in the process.

Will Almond Milk Break Autophagy?

Yes, almond milk will break autophagy. This is because it introduces nutrients (carbs, fat, and proteins) into the body which will cause insulin to be released. When this happens, autophagy is shut down and the process of breaking down and recycling old cells is halted.

This, of course, will be more noticeable if you consume sweetened almond milk as it will contain more sugar and carbs. The unsweetened version is a bit better in this regard, but it still contains enough nutrients to impact autophagy (keep in mind, autophagy does not require absolute absence of calories – it is the restriction of calories that increases the level of activity).

Can I Have Almond Milk On Fasting Days?

Absolutely. Almond milk is without a doubt very healthy and can supplement the diet of someone who is vegan or lactose intolerant. Just know that if you’re trying to intermittent fast or do any type of fasting protocol, it’s best to avoid almond milk altogether during the fast as it will cause your fast to break.

Final Words

So, there you have it. Almond milk is a healthy vegan alternative to cow’s milk, but should not be consumed while fasting if you’re trying to reap the benefits of the fast. It contains protein and carbohydrates, both of which will cause your body to go into “feeding mode” and break the fast.

Plus, if you’re really watching your caloric intake over the course of the day, opt for the unsweetened version of almond milk as it contains far less sugar than the flavored kinds.

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Mike Julom

Mike is an ACE Certified PT and a CrossFit Level 1 Trainer. He is an avid lover of all sports. Basketball, tennis, athletics, volleyball, soccer, squash, golf, table tennis, even darts, you name it! He's a very active CrossFit athlete and has been WOD'ing for over 7 years. With such an intense fitness regime, Mike has learned to take care of his body physically, nutritionally, and spiritually. Mike founded ThisIsWhyImFit as a way to share his vast knowledge of exercises, diets, and general fitness advice.

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